Black Country Communion

2

Written by: PP on 14/08/2011 04:20:13

Apparently Black Country Communion are a whole lot bigger of a band than most of us mortals (read: those who aren't stuck in the 80s) imagine, considering how many arena-sized venues they've been headlining throughout the summer this year. I guess when your band members include Glenn Hughes on bass/vocals (Deep Purple, Black Sabbath), Joe Bonamassa (Eric Clapton), Jason Bonham (Led Zeppelin), and Derek Sherinian (Dream Theater) among others, the mainstream appeal is understandable. Black Country Communion is the moniker these boys have conjured underneath, and "2", as the title suggests, is their sophomore album.

From the get go it's clear we're dealing with retrospective music that will turn off the majority of our readers in an instant. "The Outsider" mimics Iron Maiden's 80s era shamelessly, taking advantage of the heavy metal legends every step of the way. Thereafter, the band throws themselves towards a more rock'n'roll approach - still dated to a modern music fan I might add - which recalls equally much Led Zeppelin as it does Deep Purple, Dream Theater and AC/DC. There's a strong scent of rock'n'roll throughout the record, but yet it is disguised underneath a classic 80s heavy metal platform somewhat. It's an interesting combination; songs like "Man In The Middle", "Save Me" or "Smokestack Woman" emit groove in a manner that speaks for the wealth of experience behind the band and almost makes you convinced of their worth, but then you realize that in comparison to the bands they are referencing - or their own bands for that matter - the guys fall mightily short. "2" Is a good album, no doubt, but it's one of those records that when asked about in a few years' time, you'll be like "who?"

7

Download: Man In The Middle, Save Me
For the fans of: Iron Maiden, Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Dream Theater
Listen: Myspace

Release date 13.06.2011
Mascot Records

Related Items | How we score?
Comments
comments powered by Disqus

Legal

© Copyright MMXIV Rockfreaks.net.