Staff TOP10 of 2006

author PP date 02/01/07

2006 was a fantastic year for music to say the least. Great music was released on left and right, with many old faces breathing fresh air into their music, and bands nobody expected to do well surprised everyone. In more general terms, though, 2006 saw extreme music come even closer to the mainstream public than the previous year, with acts like Rise Against and My Chemical Romance hitting the video and playlist rotations of big music TV networks and radio stations alike. Perhaps neither of these two bands are as extreme as, say, Converge or Bring Me The Horizon, but nevertheless they advanced the promise of great music to the masses who usually happily digest manufactured crap all year. More and more bands integrated screaming into their music in one form or another, and less and less pop rock bands rose to stardom this year. The trend points at heavier music becoming popular, which is by all means a fantastic thing for all music, but especially those who hold the heavier genres close to their hearts can be proud of milestones like the Taste Of Chaos tour selling out a venue of 5,500 people in London as well as My Chemical Romance becoming big enough to sell out the entire Wembley Arena, or the Unholy Alliance tour that reigned Europe through November with thrash kings Slayer at the forefront of a metalheads wet dream lineup.

If we break it down even further with a magnifying glass over a small piece of land that was once named Denmark (where Rockfreaks.net resides as well), 2006 was the best year ever for Danish rock fans, as countless bands never before seen in Denmark as well as old faces all showed up in a frenzy of mindblowing performances. Here we're thinking of course Alexisonfire absolutely captivating the small but enthusiastic audience, as well as Coheed & Cambria's and Panic! At The Disco's great performances in Copenhagen, and not forgetting the Hell On Earth tour with Heaven Shall Burn, God Forbid and other kings of hardcore/metalcore fusion. But without further ado, I present you Rockfreaks.net staff's choices for the best ten albums released this year, and as shocking as it is, the Saosin fanboys (the staff) didn't include their debut album onto more than just two lists:

PP (Petteri Pertola), Editor in Chief


1. Norma Jean - Redeemer

What we said back then: "makes you wanna jump around the room shaking your fist while in memoir of events gone wrong like you predicted but nobody listened to you before"

What we say now: Redeemer is still a fucking blast of a record. There wasn't a second thought in my mind when I decided to name Norma Jean as my favorite album of the year, because it simply is the most complete hardcore album released in 2006 and by far the most long lasting. One of my favorite albums of the past few years in fact.


2. Rise Against - Sufferer & The Witness

What we said back then: "Whenever someone argues that punk is dead, I usually point them into the direction of any of the Rise Against albums."

What we say now: There isn't much left to say about Rise Against that hasn't been said so many times this year already. Sufferer & The Witness is the best album the band has ever written both in terms of style and class. Best punk album of 2006.


3. Enter My Silence - Coordinate: D1SA5T3R

What we said back then: "Brilliant. Amazing. Masterpiece."

What we say now: Finnish Enter My Silence simply wrote the album In Flames and Children Of Bodom have tried to write for the last six years if not more. Twin-guitar complexity and harmony at its very, very best.


4. Catch 22 - Permanent Revolution

What we said back then: "In terms of concept albums it is one of the best ones ever recorded."

What we say now: It was a bold statement I made back in July when I wrote the review, but I still stand by my claim. The best prog-ska album of the year with a fantastic concept.


5. UnderOATH - Define The Great Line

What we said back then: "will be considered the culmination of UnderOATH's career in the future"

What we say now: Define The Great Line has grown on me even more now, six months after its release. It's a damn fine screamo album with more substance than the entire genre put together. Simply incredible.

Solid State


6. The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus - Don't You Fake It

What we said back then: "When a band is this fucking good on their debut, where they are supposed to be looking for their sound and have a catchy song or two, how unbeliavable will they be once their songwriting leaps forward on their next album."

What we say now: Despite the Taking Back Sunday-clone feel that the album has, it still is the best emo release this year and has rightfully gone gold. Simply amazing.


7. Shook Ones - Facetious, Folly, Feat

What we said back then: "The songs hang together loosely, the instrumentals aren't full of gimmicks and the focus is on optimistic melody and speed - just like it was back in the glory days of melodic punk rock"

What we say now: Uptempo drum beat, roughened punk rock vocals, lots of attitude and speed - what more could you want from a punk rock band?


8. Converge - No Heroes

What we said back then: "they've simply fused together the brilliance of clarity and the uglyness of chaos in a way we haven't heard in over a ten years. An instant, timeless classic."

What we say now: This record is better than you and your mother. It's a mammoth that will run over you like no other record has before. Converge at their twisted best!


9. Set Your Goals - Mutiny!

What we said back then: "Whether you're a fan of harder punk or the Fall Out Boy-era almost danceable pop punk, "Mutiny!" will suit your needs, and if nothing else, it'll be the perfect record to pop on in the middle of the summer to get you in the party mood."

What we say now: A band which plays punk hardcore mixed with pop punk and plenty of self-irony - continues on the vein of positive-hardcore that Good Clean Fun laid the foundations for earlier this year.


10. Moneen - The Red Tree

What we said back then: "Like all of their prior releases, "The Red Tree" pushes all of the right buttons of its genre and beyond, resulting in it being, once again, one of the best emo releases to date."

What we say now: It was difficult to decide what to think about the new Moneen album - until I saw them live. To fully understand The Red Tree songs, you have to witness them live, the passion the band goes for on the record doesn't come through as well as it does when performed live, and after seeing the show the album grows into epic proportions. Fantastic release.

TL (Tim Larsen), Senior writer

Tim’s note: Considering how every reviewer does his own top10, I’ve taken the liberty of breaking my usual objective approach, and making my list subjective. That means that instead of listing the ten albums that deserve the highest grades, I list the 10 albums that I personally found most appealing this year. Doing it the other way around might have switched some bands around, and bumped some of the other ones out, and the reader should keep this in mind.


1. Fightstar - Grand Unification

What we said back then: "Charlie redeems himself of his early day sins with Busted, and creates an album that will be played again and again."

What we say now: No album has succeeded in making me rape it again and again since Emery did it with The Weaks End. Charlie and his post hardcore upstarts gave it competition though. One of the best albums I’ve heard to this date, and it isn’t even inaccessible.


2. Norma Jean - Redeemer

What we said back then: "makes you wanna jump around the room shaking your fist while in memoir of events gone wrong like you predicted but nobody listened to you before"

What we say now: A lesson in how to make music that is so brutal and aggressive it makes most other bands piss their pants, while still keeping it incredibly intelligent. All in all a record displaying a band that mostly looks at other bands through the rear view mirror.


3. Dog Fashion Disco - Adultery

What we said back then: "As a complete experience it is intense, complex, entertaining and it smears your senses with a thick sound of the devil tempting you with evil and decadent promises."

What we say now: Have you even heard this album? Why are you asking me why it’s here then? The expression of it is so unique, so intense, so artistic and yet so easily recognizable, that I’m tempted to say that it’s something beyond music.


4. UnderOATH - Define The Great Line

What we said back then: "will be considered the culmination of UnderOATH's career in the future"

What we say now: Music does not come in a more passionate form than the kind Underoath makes, and on this album they take the attitude and the brutality and.. well everything to an entirely different level of existence. So charismatic and convincing that you won’t have felt resolve like that since Rage Against The Machine was still around.


5. Death Before Disco - Barricades

What we said back then: "some of the absolute best stuff post hardcore has to offer"

What we say now: The album that at first seems like your average indie/emo wankery, but if you take the time to get into it reveals beauty of stunning proportions. The incredibly atmospheric and complex soundscapes are breathtaking, and everything just adds up on this record, in order to form an expression that’s artistic and captivating and still rock’n roll. Im-fuckin’-pressive.


6. Bring Me The Horizon - Count Your Blessings

What we said back then: "an aggression-filled and technical album that is simply metal as fuck, catching everyone off guard with its sheer brutality"

What we say now: An album that to me has become refreshing and soothing. The sheer aggression of this album is just so unbelievably pleasant to listen to. It’s just one huge ball of bitterness and straight middle fingers drenched in rock’n roll. It’s like having your cake and eating it too.


7. Saosin - Saosin

What we said back then: "Cove is the perfect replacement for anthony and Beau can still write mindblowing riffs that more often than not make your jaw drop to the floor."

What we say now: I can’t help it. I love Saosin, and the songs on this record will haunt my speakers and earplugs again and again, and I can’t see there ever being an end to it. If you like Saosin you’ll know why, and if you don’t I don’t think I can explain it to you.


8. Drop Dead, Gorgeus - In Vogue

What we said back then: "if you don't mind having a "WRAARRHH"-flavored cake, then don't even think about not treating yourself to "In Vogue". "WRAARRHHing" doesn't come purer nor much better than here."

What we say now: If you are into the principles of screamo, this album is your wettest dream. When I think of the very definition of the genre, this is what’s in my mind. Relentless hysterical screaming, breakdown upon dissonant breakdown, paused by short glimpses of piano melodies, only to be torn apart by more chaotic destruction of melody and structure. Music to rip yourself apart to.


9. NOFX - Wolves In Wolves' Clothing

What we said back then: "the quintessential punk rock album to get this year."

What we say now: All other punk bands, bow down, and allow NOFX to give lessons in humour, longevity, attitude, integrity and pure musicianship. The newest album is so funny, so true and so intelligent you simply have to love it. Punk rock at its very very finest.


10. Rise Against - Sufferer & The Witness

What we said back then: "Whenever someone argues that punk is dead, I usually point them into the direction of any of the Rise Against albums."

What we say now: The music on it more than makes up for the slightly tacky and streamlined (but still great) songs on the preceding record, in force of how incredibly convincing it has suddenly become. If anything is a rally flag for the left wing, then in 2006 it’s Rise Against.

AP (Aleksi Pertola), Senior writer


1. All That Remains - The Fall Of Ideals

What we said back then: "an iconic masterpiece"

What we say now: A breakthrough album for this quintet, The Fall of Ideals is metalcore the way it should be played.


2. Tool - 10,000 Days

What we said back then: "as with all Tool albums, an immense amount of time is required to understand the albums completely"

What we say now: Simply breathtaking. What more can one say about Tool?


3. Burn In Silence - Angel Maker

What we said back then: "brutal, hardcore and relentless. It is a pinnacle of metalcore, but also a hardcore metal masterpiece that will undoubtedly be around for a while."

What we say now: It's not often that a debut album sounds this good. Burn In Silence is without doubt one of the most promising bands to have entered the hazed scenes of whatevercore. This is the most atmospheric album released this year (I like to call it apocalypticore) thanks to the (controlled) chaotic instrumental arrangements and a versatile vocalist. Dark, brutal, brilliant.


4. UnderOATH - Define The Great Line

What we said back then: "will be considered the culmination of UnderOATH's career in the future"

What we say now: This is a band that only recently found its way to my playlist, and thank Bob it did. A brilliantly composed album.


5. In Flames - Come Clarity

What we said back then: "a great return to form from the band"

What we say now: After the last two disasters released by these Gothenburg masters, it was time to rediscover the roots. In Flames haven't sounded this good since Clayman.


6. Cradle of Filth - Thornography

What we said back then: "most commercial, most accessible album the band has ever released"

What we say now: Cradle of Filth took a path down the experimental road this time and it works. While the old symphonics are still there, Thornography takes a leap towards thrash metal. Though this may be their most commercial album, it is their best (we even get to hear Dani singing clean). Thornography is the most positive surprise of 2006.


7. Trivium - The Crusade

What we said back then: "a success in modern thrash metal and a triumphant obelisk of style evolution"

What we say now: Despite everyone's dreading of Matt Heafy's new vocal style and its close resemblance of James Hetfield's vocals, The Crusade represents a milestone for Trivium, and for thrash metal. The Crusade sounds like what Metallica should have sounded like after The Black Album: straightforward, uncompromising thrash metal in the oldschool way. This coupled with Heafy's emotional choruses make this an album to remember.


8. Killswitch Engage - As Daylight Dies

What we said back then: "the band is so damn good at what they do"

What we say now: Though technically a reissue of The End of Heartache, As Daylight Dies is a fucking listenable album. These old men are professionals, and this strikes out from their music. Too emo to be coming from grown men, yet annoyingly addictive and well composed.


9. My Chemical Romance - The Black Parade

What we said back then: "My Chemical Romance has 'made it' as a band"

What we say now: I used to hate My Chemical Romance, but The Black Parade is a remarkable album. It is catchy, bittersweet and addictive.


10. I Killed The Prom Queen - Music For The Recently Deceased

What we said back then: "At times brutal and merciless, at times hopeless and desperate, at times melodic and inspiring"

What we say now: Without doubt one of the most brutal albums released this year. An excellent blend of death metal and the -cores. Sharks in Your Mouth wins my award for best song of 2006.

MY (Miray Yasayan), Senior writer


1. Communic - Waves Of Visual Decay

What we said back then: "soul, power, complex structures, depth, perfect songwriting, very precise and sometimes technical drums, thrilling bass, catchy vocal melodies and awesome vocals"

What we say now: The one and only album I rated 10 this year, and in fact so did nearly everyone in metal press around the world. These guys are a talent that doesn't surface too often...maybe only once in a lifetime.


2. In Flames - Come Clarity

What we said back then: "a great return to form from the band"

What we say now: While the arguments about their change of style were going on, In Flames returned with a blasting album. Come Clarity is a mixture of the band's good old and the good new sound. Probably the worst artwork cover to the date but who cares, the songs speak for themselves


3. Evergrey - Monday Morning Apocalypse

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: Even the title track would be enough for me to choose this album for the top 10 list but I have to mention that there are also 11 more songs almost as good as this one on the album. Their heaviest sound and best album to the date.


4. Mercenary - The Hours That Remain

What we said back then: "tons of elements in their music, death metal mixed with power and progressive metal with an atmospheric sound"

What we say now: Winner of Danish Metal Awards 2006 on "Best Album Of The Year" category. Do I need to say more?


5. Katatonia - The Great Cold Distance

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: It's astonishing to see a band sounding fresh after more than 16 years in the music business. It's your biggest mistake of 2006 if you haven't heard The Great Cold Distance, been amazed by the album cover, and loved all the songs but especially melted your heart with the song "My Twin".


6. The Haunted - The Dead Eye

What we said back then: "fast, evil and thirsts for your nods"

What we say now: The album of the sharpened edges, you will love or hate this one. Reflecting another side of The Haunted, their departure from the Swedish death/thrash style to American metalcore. Most of their fans got shocked, some of them got very angry, the reactions have made the band even more angry, the fight is still going on. But whatever said, brilliant production, brilliant songs, brilliant album.


7. Faktion - Faktion

What we said back then: "so many great guitar harmonies that everbody can find something to enjoy."

What we say now: Influenced by Limp Bizkit to Guns' Roses, Faktion's self titled debut has almost everything with a good mixture of elements that belong to American nu metal and also to American mainstream rock. It is not their masterpiece, but a good guide for them to enlighten us about what they can do in the future.


8. Jon Oliva's Pain - Maniacal Renderings

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: We still don't known if the world is lucky enough to see another Savatage album but at least Savatage's mastermind Jon Oliva is feeding our souls with his solo project, Jon Oliva's Pain. The second album Maniacal Renderings was released on September and Jon Oliva's keeping his perfect form, both on singing and song writing.


8. Amorphis - Eclipse

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: Amorphis had a great chance for a restart as they found a new vocalist who is almost born to sing for Amorphis and released an album that amazed the fans. Amorphis is still as impressive as hell.


10. Boysetsfire - The Misery Index: Notes From The Plague Years

What we said back then: "an album for the masses and the underground at the same time"

What we say now: The record was born from intense frustration, anger and tears" said Boysetsfire themselves. The lyrics proved so. I am not very found of the "looks like taken from a politic speech" lyrics but other than that the songs made this CD stick to my player for a long time

KS (Kasper Skov), Senior writer


1. UnderOATH - Define The Great Line

What we said back then: "will be considered the culmination of UnderOATH's career in the future"

What we say now: I may be biased but i really do think they get better with every album.


2. Norma Jean - Redeemer

What we said back then: "makes you wanna jump around the room shaking your fist while in memoir of events gone wrong like you predicted but nobody listened to you before"

What we say now: Brutal but with more melody than before.


3. Tool - 10,000 Days

What we said back then: "as with all Tool albums, an immense amount of time is required to understand the albums completely"

What we say now: Takes a long time for it to open up, but once you get there it's awesome


4. Converge - No Heroes

What we said back then: "they've simply fused together the brilliance of clarity and the uglyness of chaos in a way we haven't heard in over a ten years. An instant, timeless classic."

What we say now: Need an explanation?


5. Rise Against - Sufferer & The Witness

What we said back then: "Whenever someone argues that punk is dead, I usually point them into the direction of any of the Rise Against albums."

What we say now: Best ever Rise Against album.


6. Saosin - Saosin

What we said back then: "Cove is the perfect replacement for anthony and Beau can still write mindblowing riffs that more often than not make your jaw drop to the floor."

What we say now: We waited a long time. It came and delivered


7. Set Your Goals - Mutiny!

What we said back then: "Whether you're a fan of harder punk or the Fall Out Boy-era almost danceable pop punk, "Mutiny!" will suit your needs, and if nothing else, it'll be the perfect record to pop on in the middle of the summer to get you in the party mood."

What we say now: best "pop"-punk this year. full of energy and melody


8. Brandtson - Hello Control

What we said back then: "maybe, just MAYBE they are even too catchy for the commercial radios"

What we say now: an electronic dance track, pop-rock tracks, poppunk tracks. This one has it all and all the songs are pretty damn good


9. Thom Yorke - The Eraser

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: Electronica album, i know - but as the singer from radiohead he'll always be asociated with a guitar


10. The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus - Don't You Fake It

What we said back then: "When a band is this fucking good on their debut, where they are supposed to be looking for their sound and have a catchy song or two, how unbeliavable will they be once their songwriting leaps forward on their next album."

What we say now: may be on a big label but i'm pretty sure the band always knew what they wanted to sound like. Great hard-rock/emo.

DY (Daniel Young), Junior writer


1. UnderOATH - Define The Great Line

What we said back then: "will be considered the culmination of UnderOATH's career in the future"

What we say now: The best screamo band around delivers another stunning collection of relentlessly hard-hitting tracks to make your eardrums beg for mercy


2. Rise Against - Sufferer & The Witness

What we said back then: "Whenever someone argues that punk is dead, I usually point them into the direction of any of the Rise Against albums."

What we say now: Full of fast paced verses with catchy choruses and Tim’s occasionally harsh vocals, it doesn’t take long to become familiar with this album but a heck of a long time to get it out of your head.


3. Incubus - Light Grenades

What we said back then: "We can all sigh in relief for Incubus has once again proven that they are some of the best musicians on the planet."

What we say now: The vast talents of every member of the band are showcased all over this album, and fused together wonderfully.


4. +44 - When Your Heart Stops Beating

What we said back then: "a solid album, and likely to make the top10 album lists of many by the end of the year."

What we say now: +44 have taken pop-punk and experimented, adding an electronic aspect to it. It’s certainly more mature and darker than blink, but still incredibly catchy.


5. Moneen - The Red Tree

What we said back then: "Like all of their prior releases, "The Red Tree" pushes all of the right buttons of its genre and beyond, resulting in it being, once again, one of the best emo releases to date."

What we say now: Jam packed with melody, impressive vocal work and interesting song structures, “The Red Tree” seems delightfully fresh every time I listen to it


6. Saosin - Saosin

What we said back then: "Cove is the perfect replacement for anthony and Beau can still write mindblowing riffs that more often than not make your jaw drop to the floor."

What we say now: I love this album and I love Saosin, so should you.


7. As I Lay Dying - A Long March: The First Recordings

What we said back then: "As I Lay Dying have slowly but surely established a hardcore legacy unmatched by anyone to date in just five years time, and this release celebrates the roots of the revolution."

What we say now: This is just quality hardcore music. It’s not hard to understand why As I Lay Dying are so widely regarded as one of the best if not the best hardcore band around


8. The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus - Don't You Fake It

What we said back then: "When a band is this fucking good on their debut, where they are supposed to be looking for their sound and have a catchy song or two, how unbeliavable will they be once their songwriting leaps forward on their next album."

What we say now: the band explores many different styles with levels of complexity that genuinely surprised me.


9. Hit The Lights - This Is A Stickup...Don't Make It A Murder

What we said back then: "If Fall Out Boy, Motion City Soundtrack, The Starting Lane, Fastlane and The Academy Is... are among your favorite bands, theres no doubt Hit The Lights will push the right buttons for you as well."

What we say now: If you want a catchy-as-hell pop punk album to listen to, look no further


10. Brand New - The Devil And God Are Raging Inside Me

What we said back then: "The small hook filled and self-reflective oddities we loved on "Deja Entendu", have been replaced by spacier and more bombastic compositions, with an an attitude that's become more rock'n roll than earlier."

What we say now: I’m pretty sure that over the next few weeks, once I’ve found the time to give this album the undivided attention it requires, I’ll be kicking myself for not placing it in the top 5.

PH (Per Hansen), Junior writer


1. Veto - There's A Beat In All Machines

What we said back then: "And yes they can. Try to imagine Interpol with Thom Yorke´s vocals and you´re almost there but yet so very far away."

What we say now: The best danish release this year without a doubt. Amazing live band as well. I still enjoy listening to the album..


2. Wolfmother - Wolfmother

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: Reminds me of Led Zeppelin. Incredible record that grows after each listen.


3. Rock Hard Power Spray - Commercial Suicide

What we said back then: "catchy riffs, solos and loads of catchy choruses."

What we say now: Denmark has not had a great punk band with english lyrics for long, and finally we have one.


4. Mikael Simpson - Stille og Uroligt

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: The magic man has done it again. He has finally broke trough in Denmark with hits as "Jeg Sidder Fast" and won the P3-gold price.


5. The Lemonheads - The Lemonheads

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: Finally some stuff from the Lemonheads again. Soothing vocals from Evan Dando and a great album from the Lemonheads as always


6. Tool - 10,000 Days

What we said back then: "as with all Tool albums, an immense amount of time is required to understand the albums completely"

What we say now: Tool as we know them. Abnormally long songs spiced up with Maynard's beautiful voice creates a must hear album.


7. Bonnie 'Prince' Billy - The Letting Go

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: The Wizard Wild Oldham has made a journey into world of mystery with this amazing deep album. .


8. Joanna Newsom - Ys

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: The harpe-playing folk-singer has made an album consisting of songs life and death with Newsom's unique voice in front.


9. Muse - Black Holes & Revelations

What we said back then: "magnificent, far-reaching sound achieved by Matthew's harmonious keyboard scales and his delicate and strong vocal work."

What we say now: A decent album from the Muse-boys. Songs like Starlight and Supermassive Black Hole will remain on my playlist for a long time.


10. Arctic Monkeys - Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not

What we said back then: N/A

What we say now: A quite nice danceable record from the Monkeys. They have been over-hyped, but I actually find myself liking this quite a lot - put on your Dancing Shoes!

Some disappointments of 2006

Some of the albums that various staff members mentioned as not meeting their expectations

Saosin – Saosin

When your previous release is “Translating The Name EP”, being top seven of a year is sort of like an insult. As good as “Saosin” is, it is still vastly overshadowed by the legendary EP.

Thursday – A City By The Light Divided

When your previous album is “War All The Time” and you decide to record it’s successor on equipment that must have been bought in toys’r’us, this is what happens.

Matchbook Romance - Voices

What the hell happened here? Too cinematic, too epic, lack of aggression.

Yellowcard - Lights And Sounds

Same as Matchbook. The band should scrap the 'big' sound and go back to the violin-based pop punk they were great at on "One For The Kids".

Muse – Black Holes And Revelations

Do I even need to argue this point?

AFI – December Underground

Killed by comparisons to earlier material in a big big way. Where did all the attitude go?

New Found Glory - Coming Home

Regardless of its catchiness, the pop has taken too much space from the punk part with New Found Glory's latest.

Into Eternity - The Scattering Of Ashes

Buried In Oblivion was quite promising with the band's unique mix of death and progressive metal sound and musical talents. The news that Andy Sneap would be behind the mixing desk, raised the hopes even more. But the result's hard to be believed. The Scattering Of Ashes is more like a compilation CD than a band's studio album. The first song's remaining from the the Into Eternity we all loved but the rest ones are weird, truly weird. It's nearly impossible to understand what's going in the songs. Mind numbing infact.

Closing word

So here we are, and you have been treated to our favorite albums of 2006. We are dying to hear yours, so use the comment system, create a forum thread, email us or send us snailmail with your top 10 lists on it! If you just can't get enough of 2006 and think it was a fan-fucking-tastic year for music, then you shall wait for a few days, and another article rounding up what was going on in 2006 will surface on the front page. Until then, happy new year to all readers and staff alike!

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